Thursday, 29 July 2010

My flesh in hope doth rest

I recently came across these two lovely inscriptions, both in Lincolnshire Churches.  The first at Lusby on the Lincolnshire Wolds and the second is at Kettlethorpe close to the border with Nottinghamshire. 

The Lusby inscription once formed part of the memorial to Katherine Palfreyman, wife of a wool merchant Anthony Palfreyman, who acquired the manor of Lusby in 1545. Katherine died in 1555 and the touching inscription takes the form of a conversation between the deceased and her grieving husband.  Anthony finally died in 1590.

Lusby, Lincolnshire


My fleshe in hope and rest doth slepe
In earth here to remayne
my spirit to Christ I gyve to kepe
Till I do ryse again.

And I wyth you in hope agre
Toughe (sic.) I yet here abyde
In full purpose if Goddes will be
To ly downe by your syde.

The second monument at Kettlethorpe is a black stone tablet in the chancel to the memory of John Becke MA, rector of the parish.  He died in Mary 1597. It has a lovely punning inscription, recording his munificence to the parish.  He gave lands to endow a charity to support the poor of the parish. 

Kettlethorpe, Lincolnshire

I am a Becke or river as you know

and watred here the church the schole the pore
While God did make my springes here for to flo
But now my fountaine stopt it runs no more
From church and schole mi life is now berefte

But to the poore four pounds I yearlye lefte.

Wednesday, 21 July 2010

Skelton stiff leaf

Skelton, North Riding of Yorkshire

Shortly after writing my recent post on stiff-leaf and posting a photo of the stiff leaf on the doorway at Skelton St Giles near York, I came across the following article. 
http://www.dioceseofyork.org.uk/news-events/news/news-from-the-diocese-of-york/01384.html

The weathered south door of this excellent and complete Early English building, has been restored by a York firm called Lanstone and they have one a prize for the work in the York Design Awards.  Here is a detail of the door as it was prior to restoration:

Skelton, North Riding of Yorkshire

And here is the door after restoration:



What an excellent job they've done if it.  There are further photos here.

Monday, 19 July 2010

Rycote Chapel, Oxfordshire

Tower Squint, Rycote Chapel, Oxfordshire



















I may have drawn your attention to the excellent photography of my friend Martin Beek in some earlier posts, but can I mention his name again.  As well as an being an excellent and photographer with a great eye for detail, Martin is an artist of great breadth and accomplishment who works in a wide range of different media and there is a lot of interest on his Flickr pages.   I was recently drawn to a series of photos he's taken of Rycote Chapel in Oxfordshire.
Rycote Chapel, Oxfordshire

Rycote chapel was built in the late 1450s for Richard and Sybil Quatermayne, to serve a chantry college founded by them in 1449.  The fabric consisting of a west tower, a nave and chancel in one with a barrel ceiling, remains pretty much as they built it.  Inside the building are a series of extraodinary furnishings.  Medieval benches and stalls still remain in the chancel, but the rest of the furnishings are early seventeenth century and high church.  On either side of the rood screen, which is a remodelled medieval screen, are two vast family pews.  That on the north is the pew of the Norreys family, who were lord's of the manor.  Above it a musician's gallery.  The pew to the south, with it's ogee canopy painted like a night sky within, was apparently built for Charles I when he visited Rycote in 1625.  With four angels at the corners, it was once topped with an image of the Virgin Mary, an iconographical display that would have enraged any seventeenth century Puritan.  In the chancel is a reredos of 1610 and an altar surrounded by balustered rails of the later seventeenth century.  Rycote chapel is a glorious example of an Anglican high church interior from those decadent first decades of the seventeenth century and is rare to have survived unscathed.      

Rycote Chapel, Oxfordshire

Rycote Chapel, Oxfordshire

Rycote, Oxfordshire

Saturday, 17 July 2010

Malvern Link

Malvern Link



I'm grateful to a Facebook friend Julie Allsopp, who has recently taken the following photos of the once glorious conventual chapel of the Holy Name at Malvern Link in Worcestershire.  This chapel, dating from 1893 is an early work by Bucknall and Comper. The community of the Holy Name moved to Derby in 1990 and the building has subsequently been used for other purposes.  As you will see the Comper fittings are not in good condition.  I understand that the building has been recently sold and is due to be converted into office space and the fittings restored.  I do hope it happens.    
Malvern Link
The crucifixion that formed the top of the reredos, has been removed to admit a air conditioning unit. 

Malvern Link
Said air conditioning unit. 

Malvern Link
The painted ceiling is still in good condition

Malvern Link
Abandoned riddel posts. 

More photos here.

Thursday, 15 July 2010

Lovely, lovely stiff leaf

'Early English capitals are not so much diversified as Norman. When foliage is introduced it is placed upon the bell of the capital; the leaves usually have stiff stalks rising from the neck of the bell, hence called technically "stiff-leaf foliage," but almost always stand out very boldly, and with great freedom, so as to provide a very striking and beautiful effect, and they are generally very well worked, and often as much undercut that the stalks and more prominent parts are entirely detached.'
(J. H. Parker's Glossary of Terms, 1850)
Below are a series of images of luscious thirteenth century stiff-leaf capitals from across the country. 

Torksey, Lincolnshire
Torksey, Lincolnshire

Low Marnham, Nottinghamshire
Low Marnham, Nottinghamshire

Inglesham, Wiltshire
Inglesham, Wiltshire

East Hagbourne, Berkshire
East Hagbourne, Berkshire

North Stoke, Oxfordshire
North Stoke, Oxfordshire

Skelton, North Riding of Yorkshire
Skelton, North Yorkshire

Tuesday, 13 July 2010

Shadows of Former Things Part III

Glentham, Lincolnshire

Site of a former side altar at Glentham in Lincolnshire, an arched niche that probably contained a panel of a reredos and beside it a bracket for an image.  How tantalising these remains are, but sadly so difficult to put in any true context without any documentary evidence of the imagery they contained and supported. 

Glentham, Lincolnshire

Above the south porch at Glentham is something much rarer, a weathered fifteenth century image of Our Lady of Pity, a Pieta.  Below it are the arms of the Tourney family of Caenby, who presumably paid for the porch. 

Cadney, Lincolnshire

Further north near Brigg Lincolnshire is the rather rustic and isolated church at Cadney.  One of the Norman nave pillars of the south arcade has been adapted in the fourteenth century in order to admit a bracket and canopy for a long-lost image. 

Saturday, 3 July 2010

Transitional

Martin, Lincolnshire

Martin church near Horncastle in Lincolnshire, has a fabulous chancel arch.  This narrow arch is a text book example of the Transitional style, the moment when Norman architecture gradually gave way to Early English Gothic.  In this arch we have a blending of the two.  The responds are entirely Norman in character, with two orders of shafts topped with fairly standard Norman capitals, a pair scalloped and a pair with volutes.  A little bit of nailhead decoration is incorporated into these capitals too.  Then the whole thing is topped with an Early English arch, a steep pointed arch. The whole thing must be late twelfth or early thirteenth century.       

Martin, Lincolnshire

Martin, Lincolnshire

Thursday, 1 July 2010

Five wounds of Christ

Five Wounds of Christ

Angel holding the arma christi, a shield charged with the five wounds.  It is unusual to see this subject in colour, usually it is rendered in yellow stain.  This image from Lawrence Lew's wonderful photostream, is taken from a panel of fifteenth century glass in Glastonsbury parish church, that was formerly in Glastonbury Abbey in Somerset.   If you enjoyed this image you may enjoy some of the images from Lawrence's recent churchcrawl in Somerset.